Showing 395 results

Makers and Shapers

Bru de Wold, Col HT

  • Person
  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Colonel H.T. Bru-de-Wold, Commandant of Natal Volunteers from 1902 to 1907. He was interviewed by James Stuart in 1906.]

Bulawako Ginindza

  • Person
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Bulawako Ginindza. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Embekelweni area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Cane, Christian

  • Person
  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: Christian Cane alias Lavuta, was born in Dingane's reign and was the son of John Cane. He was born at Mbizane and lived at Sikisiki in Pondoland. He was interviewed by James Stuart in 1907.]

Captain J. E. Foster

  • Person
  • Unknown

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA, 2016, using The London Gazette (published Oct 2, 1900), 2017: Captain J.E. Forster (also written as Foster) was a member of the 3rd Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment was seconded for service with Line Battalion in South Africa on the 3rd of October 1900. No other biographical information is available.]

Carolyn Hamilton

  • Person
  • 17 August 1958 - present

[Source - Carolyn Hamilton on the Archive and Public Culture Research Initiative website, 2016: In the 1980s, at the beginning of my academic life, I attempted a thesis on power and authority in the Zulu kingdom under Shaka. It was well received, but I came away from the exercise concerned about my sources and the complex entanglements in which they were involved.

I spent the next ten years of my research life probing those entanglements and published Terrific Majesty: The Powers of Shaka Zulu and the Limits of Invention (Harvard University Press) in 1998. At the time South African Marxist historian reviewers rued what they regarded as my turn to ‘postmodernism’. This surprised me since the book was an attempt to understand the complex interplay over time of political, academic and public discourses and practices that shaped, and were shaped, by the archives used in my original thesis. Terrific Majesty was an enquiry into the making of the archive of Shakan times. I regarded it as a prudent methodological prerequisite to trying to write about the early Zulu kingdom. It was, if anything, a bit prissy and conservative in its historical concern, rather than redolent in postmodern excess.

I felt reasonably sure that I knew enough about political and academic discourses and practices to explore those aspects of my concern. After all, I had a large body of research by other scholars to help me there. But the notions of 'archive' and 'public' were, at the time, less well served by existing scholarly analysis. They became increasingly strange to me and I became uncertain about them, in the way that anthropologists do about such things. (And by then I had come to value anthropological perspectives on the taken-for-granted.) 'Archive' and 'public' thus became the focus of the next series of projects which I initiated: the five year-long Constitution of Public Intellectual Life Research Project, its ongoing successor forum, the Public Life of Ideas Network, the Refiguring the Archive exercise, and its yet ongoing successor, the Research Initiative in Archive & Public Culture.

Sometime shortly I hope to feel sure enough about what has happened to 'the sources' to launch into public life those bits of the original thesis from the 1980s which yet remain unpublished. Scholarly work can be a slow business!

I have had the good fortune to worry about sources, archives, the public life of ideas and many other things in the company of boldly inquiring and imaginative graduate students, from across a range of disciplines. The challenges they offer me, and that they face in pursuit of their ideas, have prompted me to think a great deal about the nature of research development, especially in a transitional context like contemporary South Africa. Issues concerning research development and post-graduate pedagogy are increasingly of as much concern to me as the troublesome entanglements that I have researched.

I first entered university in 1976, baptized into the world of politics in a time of student and worker activism, Yeoville communes, and the dangerous lives of exiles in places like Swaziland. An activist disposition developed then remains with me, realized in the APC Research Initiative most obviously through my nurturing of the Archival Platform intervention, in partnership with the Nelson Mandela Foundation.]

Cedric Poggenpoel

  • Person
  • [19-?] - present

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using the Cape Archaeological Survey website http://www.casprojects.co.za/: Cedric Poggenpoel is a South African archaeologist who received his Master's degree in archaeology from the University of Cape Town in 1996. In the early 1970s, Poggenpoel was working as a technical officer at the University of Cape Town. During this time he, alongside John Parkington, discovered the Diepkloof rock shelter, which they subsequently excavated over a number of years. He is a specialist in faunal identification with an interest in fish taxonomy. In 2008 he began work as the Field Director at Cape Archaeological Survey.]

Cetwayo Mndzebele

  • Person
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Cetwayo Mndzebele. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Mkhitshini area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Clarence van Riet Lowe

  • Person
  • 4 November 1894 – 7 June 1956

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using the Wikipedia article on Clarence van Riet Lowe: Clarence van Riet Lowe was was a South African civil engineer and archaeologist. In 1935 he was the first director of the Bureau of Archaeology. He served for the South African army in both WWI and WWII. In 1938 he received his Doctorate of Science in Archaeology from the University of Cape Town. In 1954 he retired from the Bureau of Archaeology (which was then called the "Archaeological Survey"). He died in Knysna in 1956.]

Colenbrander, HJ

  • Person
  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about H. J. Colenbrander. He was interviewed by James Stuart in 1900.]

Colenso, Miss

  • Person
  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Miss Colenso (probably Miss Harriette Emily Colenso). She was interviewed by James Stuart in 1904.]

Colin de B. Webb

  • Person
  • 24 October 1930 - 22 March 1992

[Source - John Wright for FHYA, 2016: Colin de Berri Webb was born in Pretoria on 24 October 1930. He attended Pretoria Boys' High School, and in 1948 went on to the University of the Witwatersrand on a Barclay's Bank Scholarship. In 1955, as a holder of the prestigious Elsie Ballot Scholarship, he proceeded to Clare College, Cambridge, to read history. In 1957 he took up his first university appointment as a temporary lecturer in the Department of History and Political Science at the University of Natal, Durban. There he met Fleur Gower, who was on the staff teaching Introductory French. They married in 1960. In 1962 Colin came as a senior lecturer to the Department of History and Political Science in Pietermaritzburg, the same year his eldest son, Jonathan, was born. Nicholas followed in 1964. Colin' s promotion in 1971 to associate professor was only his due. Then in 1976 he moved to the University of Cape Town as the King George V Professor of History, filling this, the premier history chair in South Africa.

With the death of Professor Colin Webb on 22 March 1992, both Natalia and the Natal Society have lost a much esteemed and long standing associate. He played a prominent role in the founding of Natalia and was the first chairman of its editorial board (1971-75), as well as a council member of the Natal Society (1965-75, 1988-92), and one of its vice-presidents (1988-92).

His was a presence that loomed. Yet it was much more than his sheer physical stature that indelibly impressed Colin Webb' s persona on the consciousness of all who knew him. For he was many things: teacher, scholar, administrator and public figure; but also husband and father of two sons, and valued friend and colleague. Authority emanated from him, but always tempered by his approachability, obvious integrity and fine sense of humour. Who can forget his beam of delight and high-pitched, trilling laugh? His company was always stimulating and could be enormous fun, for he was a man of wit and dramatic flair, with wide interests besides history and education. He could talk with real knowledge and insight on subjects ranging from politics, drama, music and fine art to veld types and domestic gardens. And though he could be formidable at times, it was with the short intensity of a summer storm, soon to pass. For he was a man of passion, who believed passionately in what he did and in the firm liberal principles which guided his actions.]

Colonel Henry Wemyss Feilden

  • Person
  • 6 October 1838 - 8 June 1921

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using the obituary of Henry Wemyss Feilden published in (1921), Obituary. Ibis, 63: 726–732. doi:10.1111/j.1474-919X.1921.tb01297.x, 2017: Colonel Henry Wemyss Feilden was born in 1838, and was the second son of Sir William Feilden. He joined the army at age 19, serving in India and China, as well as in South Africa during the Boer Campaign of 1881 and the Boer War of 1890, where he worked as the Paymaster of Imperial Yeomanry. He also held a post in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. He married Julia MacCord in 1864, to whom he would remain married until her death in 1920. He worked extensively as an ornithologist and zoologist, and served as the naturalist on Sir George Nares' Northern Polar Expedition in 1875. He was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and was decorated for his service in India, China and South Africa, and was appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath for his services to Imperial Yeomanry in 1900.]

Cooper, AW

  • Person
  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about A.W. Cooper. He was interviewed by James Stuart in 1907 at the Victoria Club in Pietermaritzburg.]

Coventry, GH

  • Person
  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about G. H. Coventry, field cornet of Acton Homes. He was interviewed by James Stuart in 1900 in Ladysmith.]

D. Mdhlalose

  • Person
  • c.1891 - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018, using The Collection of Father Franz Mayr Zulu Recordings 1908, CD booklet: D. Mdhalose was recorded by Father Franz Mayr in around 1908. She was about 17 years old and a school pupil at the time of recording.]

DA Thieme

  • Publisher
  • [18-?] - ?

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using wikipedia: DA Thieme was a prominent Dutch publisher in the 1800s. A prize, known as the DA Thiemeprijs, was founded in 1879 by friends of DA Thieme, to be given to a person or organization that has performed exceptionally in or around the Dutch book trade.]

Dabula ka Mgingqiyizana

  • Person
  • 1879 - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Dabula kaMgingqiyizana of the Dunge people. He worked as a rickshaw pulle and was interviewed by James Stuart in 1916.]

Daily News

  • Publisher
  • [18-?] - present

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using wikipedia: Daily News is a daily newspaper owned by Independent News & Media SA and published every weekday afternoon in Durban, South Africa. Between 1936 and 1962 the newspaper was called Natal Daily News. Prior to 1936 (dating back into the 19th century) it was called The Natal (Mercantile) Advertiser.]

Deare, GR

  • Person
  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about George R. Deare. He was a sub-inspector of the police in 'Zululand' from about 1889 to 1890. He was interviewed by James Stuart in 1902.]

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