Affichage de 395 résultats

Notice d'autorité

Mphundle Maziya

  • Personne
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Mphundle Maziya. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Maphungwane area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Mbane Msibi

  • Personne
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Mbane Msibi. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Steynsdorp area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Rotter Sicheme Mamba

  • Personne
  • [19-] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: Rotter Sicheme Mamba was a translator and transcriber who worked on the interviews conducted by Philip Bonner in Swaziland in the 1970s.]

Nkambule

  • Personne
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Nkambule. He was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Buseleni area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Mjole Sifundunza

  • Personne
  • [19-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using WITS materials: At this time the FHYA has not been able to locate biographical information about Mjole Sifundunza (Sifundza) was interviewed by Philip Bonner in the Land of Shewula area of Swaziland in 1970.]

Sir H. Baldry

  • Personne
  • Unknown

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2018: No biographical information available. Material collected by H. Baldry was accessioned into the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge in 1927.]

Colonel Henry Wemyss Feilden

  • Personne
  • 6 October 1838 - 8 June 1921

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using the obituary of Henry Wemyss Feilden published in (1921), Obituary. Ibis, 63: 726–732. doi:10.1111/j.1474-919X.1921.tb01297.x, 2017: Colonel Henry Wemyss Feilden was born in 1838, and was the second son of Sir William Feilden. He joined the army at age 19, serving in India and China, as well as in South Africa during the Boer Campaign of 1881 and the Boer War of 1890, where he worked as the Paymaster of Imperial Yeomanry. He also held a post in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. He married Julia MacCord in 1864, to whom he would remain married until her death in 1920. He worked extensively as an ornithologist and zoologist, and served as the naturalist on Sir George Nares' Northern Polar Expedition in 1875. He was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and was decorated for his service in India, China and South Africa, and was appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath for his services to Imperial Yeomanry in 1900.]

Miss Mary Frere

  • Personne
  • c.1802 - YYYY

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA, 2016, using MAA materials: Miss Mary Frere was the sister of British colonial administrator Henry Bartle Frere. She donated materials collected by Henry Bartle Frere to the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. That material was accessioned in 1912.]

Dr. Everitt George Dunne Murray

  • Personne
  • 1890 - 6 July 1964

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA , 2017, using the Obituary Notice for Murray written in the Journal of General Microbiology, 1967 Vol. 46, and the McGill University Department of Microbiology and Immunology website, 2017: Dr. Everitt G.D. Murray, known as 'Jo'burg' to his friends and colleagues, was born in Johannesburg in 1890. At age 15 he was sent to Downside School in England, and then went on to study at the University of Cambridge, where he developed a particular interest in zoology. He later underwent medical training at Bart's. In 1916 he qualified as a Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries. In the same year, he was sent Mesopotamia to work on dysentery, until he fell ill and was sent to India to recover. After India, he returned to Johannesburg to see his father, and worked as Medical Officer in charge of troopships on both the east and west coasts of Africa. He married Winifred Woods in December 1917. In 1919 Murray was appointed Demonstrator in Pathology at Bart’s and in 1920 he became an M.R.C. Research Bacteriologist, at first working in the Field Laboratories in Milton Road, Cambridge. Murray became the first chairman of the Department of Bacteriology at McGill University in 1931. In addition to his various academic posts, Murray actively served McGill’s teaching hospitals. Until 1955 he was Bacteriologist-in-Chief of the Royal Victoria Hospital including the closely affiliated Montreal Maternity Hospital and the Montreal Neurological Institute, and an Honorary Consultant to the Royal Victoria, Montreal General, Children’s Memorial, Jewish General, and Royal Edward Laurentian Hospitals. He was also Honorary Consultant to the Victorian Order of Nurses for Canada and a member of the Board of Governors of the Alexandra Hospital. Murray collected ethnographic and biological material from southern Africa, some of which is housed in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Cambridge.]

Sir William Ridgeway

  • Personne
  • 6 August 1858 - 12 August 1926

[Source - Nessa Leibhammer for FHYA, 2016, using MAA materials: Sir William Ridgeway was the Chairman of the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge, and the Disney Professor of Archaeology. He first appears in the MAA records in 1896 when he became a member of The Antiquarian Committee and donated several archaeological artefacts to the collection, AR 1896.75-88. He remained an avid collector, with a particular interest in currency, but contributed to collections from many regions of the world. He died in 1926, and bequeathed his archaeological and ethnographic collections to MAA.]

Pieter W. Grobbelaar

  • Personne
  • 25 December 1930 - 19 January 2013

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using wikipedia: Pieter Willem Grobbelaar was a South African author primarily known for his children's and youth stories. He started his career as a journalist at Die Burger and continued it at Die Volksblad in Bloemfontein. He became director of the South African Broadcasting Corporation in 1956. In 1984 he became a professor in the Department of African Culture at the University of Stellenbosch. He died in 2013.]

Tomu Sibiya

  • Personne
  • [18-?] - [19-?]

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using material provided by eThembeni Cultural Heritage: Tomu Sibiya was the son of Dazukile Sibiya, who served as one of King Mpande's household. Tomu Sibiya was born in the Nkandhla District and belonged to the Mbokodebomvu regiment.]

Five Hundred Year Archive (FHYA)

  • Research Initiative
  • Fl. 2012 - present

[Source - Archive and Public Culture Research Initiative website, 2017: Research and enquiries into aspects of the southern African past in the periods predating the existence of European imperial and colonial archives have been complicated by the absence of contemporary written sources. One crucial move to address this apparent obstacle has been to make use of physical objects and sonic items. Yet much of the material concerning the remote southern African past – including artefacts in daily use, objects that testify to trade activities and creative works is misidentified, often undated, lost or dispersed in institutions across the world or held in settings that are largely inaccessible private and/or not recognizably archival. By archival we mean made available for use in such a way that their origins and provenance, and multiple histories across time, are foregrounded. A second concern lies in the ways this material, as well as the written documents that refer to earlier independent periods, was shaped by colonial and later apartheid knowledge practices.

The aim of this project, The Five Hundred-Year Archive (FHYA), a name provided by an earlier initiative (see Swanepoel N., Esterhuysen, A and Bonner, P (eds.), 500 Years Rediscovered: Southern African Precedents and Prospects (Johannesburg, Wits University Press, 2008)- is to develop and promote understandings of the archival possibilities of materials located both within and outside of formal archives and to facilitate their engagement. It does this in order to stimulate interest, research and enquiries into the southern African past.

An initial move in this endeavour is the creation of an accessible online exemplar, which is capable of convening, in a virtual format, visual, textual and sonic materials pertinent to these periods. The exemplar aims to be a conceptually innovative intervention geared to engaging, in a critical manner, inherited forms of knowledge organization. It is being constructed to work across multiple institutions and to incorporate a variety of media formats, be capable of handling diverse objects, and provide context, by taking into account, most notably, the provenance and spatial and temporal locations of the various materials, as well as their multiple histories. The exemplar is designed in such a way as to facilitate recognition and understanding of the ways in which disciplinary conventions and colonial and apartheid knowledge practices have shaped the materials concerned. In some cases, it unpicks aspects of that shaping, notably the forms of classification to which such materials were subjected historically.

The project is a feasibility exercise that explores the possibilities of new ways of thinking about, and stimulating activity in relation to, archives for a region long denied an archive; a region that was offered instead ideas of timeless traditional culture. It does not aim to create an authoritative, stand-alone digital archive that will exist in perpetuity. It is, instead, a catalytic intervention that seeks to activate new kinds of archival energies.

The Archive and Public Culture Research Initiative (APC), based at the University of Cape Town, with the support of the KwaZulu-Natal Museum, Wits Historical Papers and the Killie Campbell Africana Library, and with expressions of interest from a number of overseas institutions, took the lead in raising the funds for an initial three-year project, which directly addresses both the conceptual and technical aspects of such an endeavour. The initial feasibility study is made in relation to one area (what is today southern Swaziland, KwaZulu-Natal and the north Eastern Cape region of Southern Africa), but is designed in such a way that its regional coverage could be readily extended in an aggregative way to a much wider geographic area. The feasibility study has two phases: an initial consultation and preparation stage (July 2013 – June 2014) and a second implementation stage (July 2014 – June 2017).]

DA Thieme

  • Publisher
  • [18-?] - ?

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using wikipedia: DA Thieme was a prominent Dutch publisher in the 1800s. A prize, known as the DA Thiemeprijs, was founded in 1879 by friends of DA Thieme, to be given to a person or organization that has performed exceptionally in or around the Dutch book trade.]

Huisgenoot

  • Publisher
  • 1916 - present

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using the Wikipedia article on Huisgenoot: Huisgenoot is a weekly Afrikaans-language general-interest family magazine. It was founded as the monthly De Huisgenoot in 1916. The Dutch-sounding title De Huisgenoot was later changed to the more Afrikaans-sounding Die Huisgenoot and, finally, in 1977 the name was further simplified to simply Huisgenoot. The magazine remains in publication to this day.]

Ditsong National Museum of Natural History, formerly the Transvaal Museum

  • Museum
  • 1895 - present

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using wikipedia and the Ditsong Museums of South Africa website: The Ditsong National Museum of Natural History, formerly known as the Transvaal Museum, is a natural history museum situated in Pretoria, South Africa. The museum was initially established in 1892 as the Staatsmuseum (State Museum) of the former South African Republic. The Transvaal Museum became a part of the Northern Flagship Institution (the NFI) in April 1999. The NFI was officially renamed Ditsong Museums of South Africa in April 2010 and the Transvaal Museum was renamed Ditsong National Museum of Natural History at the same time. The Museum’s collections and exhibits include hominid fossils from the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site and associated fauna, including Mrs Ples (the nickname attributed to a fossil skull believed to represent a distant relative of all humankind); fossils, skeletons, skins and mounted specimens of amphibians, fish, invertebrates, reptiles and mammals.]

University of KwaZulu-Natal, formerly University of Natal (UKZN)

  • University
  • 1910 - present

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2020, using the UKZN website: The University of KwaZulu-Natal was formed on 1 January 2004 as a result of the merger between the University of Durban-Westville and the University of Natal. The University of Durban-Westville was established in the 1960s as the University College for Indians on Salisbury Island in Durban Bay. Founded in 1910 as the Natal University College in Pietermaritzburg, the University of Natal was granted independent university status in 1949 owing to its rapid growth in numbers, its wide range of courses and its achievements in and opportunities for research.]

Wondi

  • [18-?] - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: Wondi was of Zuma isibongo, which was a part of the Basuto race. He lived at Byrnetown. He was interviewed by James Stuart in 1907 in Pietermaritzburg.]

Xaba, Lazarus

  • 1839 - YYYY

[Source - Chloe Rushovich for FHYA, 2017, using KCAL materials: Lazarus Xaba arrived in Natal from Swaziland with Reverend Albert Allison in 1846. He was interviewed by James Stuart in 1910 in Pietermaritzburg. He was 72 years old when he was interviewed by Stuart.]

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